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Economy

Confronting the Myths of Suburban Poverty

It's the newer suburbs, not the old ones, that are struggling with the largest numbers of low-income residents.  
In general, people don't associate poverty with the suburbs. That's partly why it's such a persistent issue there.
In general, people don't associate poverty with the suburbs. That's partly why it's such a persistent issue there. Russel Sage Foundation

There’s nothing new about suburban poverty, but in the popular imagination, it’s often not regarded as much of a problem. Instead, the “inner cities”—code for poor, black urban communities—receive the brunt of the attention (if not the resources).

While some communities have grappled with local solutions, by and large, the rising poverty in the American suburbs has been allowed to fester and grow, catalyzed by the Great Recession. At the same time, who lives in the suburbs has changed. As cities become more expensive, immigrants and communities of color have made a home for themselves outside the urban core—only to come face-to-face with the same issues they left behind.