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Perspective

Three Keys to Inclusive Growth

To create economic opportunities, cities must confront their past—and look to the future.
Better jobs, living wages, and workers' rights were central issues for May Day marchers in Los Angeles.
Better jobs, living wages, and workers' rights were central issues for May Day marchers in Los Angeles.Kyle Grillot/Reuters

Recently, a jury in Minnesota acquitted the police officer who shot and killed Philando Castile during a traffic stop last summer, sparking renewed anger over a criminal justice system that perpetuates historic racial bias in cities. On the same day, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced his company had bought Whole Foods for $13.4 billion, potentially upending the future of retail.

These were not unrelated events. They represent the twin urgencies that local and regional leaders must confront if they want to create broad-based prosperity: Make right the wrongs of the past, while radically preparing for the future.