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Two Cuban-Born Artists Depict Detroit's Resurgence

In a new exhibition, Alejandro Campins and José Yaque capture the energy of the city’s past while exploring its future.
José Yaque built a cross-section of the city, whose strata includes items he found around the city.
José Yaque built a cross-section of the city, whose strata includes items he found around the city.Installation view “City of Queen Anne’s Lace” at Wasserman Projects, José Yaque works courtesy Galleria Continua, Alejandro Campins works courtesy Sean Kelly Gallery NY, Image by P.D. Rearick

When the curator Rafael DiazCasas and the Cuban artists Alejandro Campins and José Yaque were first in Detroit together 2015, they were struck by the amount of green land in the city. “In abandoned lots where houses used to be, we always saw something growing, something new,” says DiazCasas. They often found Queen Anne’s lace, a weed also known as wild carrot, which can be seen crawling the walls of abandoned buildings and empty lots during Detroit summers and, for many, has come to symbolize the city’s resilience.

At Wasserman Projects near Eastern Market, you can now find a new exhibit by same name. In “City of Queen Anne’s Lace,” curated by DiazCasas, Yaque and Campins explore the history and regeneration of Detroit, both in its organic and built forms.