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Mapping the Modern Transformation of New York City

The New York City Comptroller’s office has a trove of data comparing neighborhood change from 2000 to 2015. We mapped it.
New York City experienced some profound demographic changes since 2000.
New York City experienced some profound demographic changes since 2000. Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

Last week, we showed you a big trove of the latest data on New York City’s neighborhood changes from 2000 to 2015, courtesy of the New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer. We asked Chris Vaillancourt over at the mapping company ESRI to help us make more sense of how Gotham’s 55 sub-boroughs have gentrified and shifted in their populations over the last decade and a half.

There are many ways to measure gentrification, but for simplicity’s sake we use NYU’s Furman Center’s criteria for gentrifying neighborhoods: where neighborhoods that had households earning lower incomes later experienced rent growth at a higher rate than the median neighborhood.