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Berlin Preserves Its Trippy 1980s Subway Stations

They’re cheerful, witty, and a little bizarre.
Tiles at Berlin's Paulsternstrasse Station
Tiles at Berlin's Paulsternstrasse StationIngolf/Twitter

Today, seven of the oddest-looking subway stations in Europe are getting an unlikely accolade: They’re being listed as historic monuments for the first time.

The seven stations are all located in western Berlin, part of a city subway network where preservation orders are far from unheard of—with good reason, given their frequent beauty. What’s striking about today’s plans is just how new the stations are. They all date to that bygone golden age for Europe’s architectural heritage, the years 1980 to 1984. The seven newly protected stations are in one of the last sections of the subway system to be constructed exclusively within West Berlin, extending the network into Spandau, a suburban town still sitting within the confines of the Berlin Wall.