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The Tech Helping Immigrants Hack the Ban

Across the country, designers and coders are coming together to develop tools for communities targeted by Trump’s orders.
Coders, including the NYU grad student Jen Kagan, are collaborating on projects to connect immigrant populations with resources.
Coders, including the NYU grad student Jen Kagan, are collaborating on projects to connect immigrant populations with resources. Eric Grant

Tech firms are increasingly dipping their toes into politics since President Donald Trump took office. For one thing, they’ve been among the most vocal opposition to his immigration orders. When he floated the idea of a Muslim registry in December, more than a thousand tech employees signed a pledge not to take part in creating it. Then when he initiated his temporary travel ban on seven Muslim-majority countries in January, companies from Apple to Netflix to Microsoft filed a legal brief arguing that the ban posed “significant harm” to businesses.

CityLab recently spoke with developers who say the contribution from Silicon Valley may not go much farther than that, at least from the executives. (In fact, according to the New York Times, it was the employees who pushed many of the tech giants to take a stronger stand against Trump.) Instead, those workers believe some of the most significant efforts will come from techies volunteering their time.