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The Rise of Anti-Sanctuary Cities

To carry out its immigration agenda, the Trump administration will rely on local jurisdictions—and a 1990s-era enforcement program criticized for racial profiling and inefficiency. Here’s what those cities and counties are signing up for.
A border patrol vehicle stands along the U.S.-Mexico border in Nogales, Arizona. Soon, local police in many counties near the border may be deputized to take on border patrol duties.
A border patrol vehicle stands along the U.S.-Mexico border in Nogales, Arizona. Soon, local police in many counties near the border may be deputized to take on border patrol duties.Jae C. Hong/AP

Last week, Anne Arundel County in Maryland announced it would be taking a “moderate and measured” approach to local immigration enforcement by signing up for a program that trains detention officers to enforce immigration law. “We work with the federal government pretty much across the gamut, whether it’s health issues or education. Why would we stop at immigration?” Owen McEvoy, the spokesperson for the county executive, tells CityLab. “It was something that, frankly, we’d been contemplating well before the election ... No matter who was president, there was an interest. The question was: Would the interest be on the other side?”

That, there certainly is.