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The Cities That Will Feel a 'Day Without Immigrants'

In addition to being key to creative work, immigrants contribute enormously in the working-class and services sectors of the economy.
Construction workers are seen at a new building site in Silver Spring, Maryland, U.S. June 2, 2016.
Construction workers are seen at a new building site in Silver Spring, Maryland, U.S. June 2, 2016.Gary Cameron/Reuters

Earlier today, I wrote about how the Trump administration’s move to curb immigration could devastate the talent base of the nation—especially in large cities and metro areas like the San Francisco Bay area, Los Angeles, New York City, and Miami.

Meanwhile, all around the country, restaurant workers and construction workers in cities have gone on strike to protest President Trump’s immigration agenda. Given that, it is just as appropriate to highlight the way that our country and its metros depend on immigrants for blue-collar work and lower-paying jobs in the service economy.