Skip to content
CityLab
Economy

In Job Training, a Little Support Can Go a Long Way

Help with navigating everyday challenges—like housing, transportation, and child care—can be key to completing job training, a new report finds.
Students in the culinary arts program at a technical college in Los Angeles.
Students in the culinary arts program at a technical college in Los Angeles.Fred Prouser/Reuters

Of the all the people who begin some form of job training each year, many leave without finishing it. Life gets in the way: Often, a lack of money, reliable transportation, or child care poses a hurdle, or the logistics of fitting classes around work interfere. One recent analysis found that among adults who participated in certain training programs, about three in ten who left did not complete the program.

A new report by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), a Washington, D.C. think tank, presents evidence that access to supportive services helps unemployed and underemployed people complete job and skills training.