Why It's So Hard for America to Kick Its Sugar Habit

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Cans of soft drink sit stacked on pallets in a storage area following manufacture at the Coca-Cola Co. factory in Dongen, Netherlands, on Thursday, Aug. 4, 2016. Coca-Cola, the world's largest soft-drink company, last month posted second-quarter sales that missed analysts' estimates as falling revenue abroad outweighed modest gains in the U.S. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg
Cans of soft drink sit stacked on pallets in a storage area following manufacture at the Coca-Cola Co. factory in Dongen, Netherlands, on Thursday, Aug. 4, 2016. Coca-Cola, the world's largest soft-drink company, last month posted second-quarter sales that missed analysts' estimates as falling revenue abroad outweighed modest gains in the U.S. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg


Every other week, hosts Jenny Kaplan and Lindsey Rupp guide you through the consumer universe, breaking down what's going on with all the things people buy.

This time of year feels like a continuous feast. With pumpkin spice lattes and apple pie and holiday cookies at every turn, Americans are constantly confronted by sugar. More than half of the nation's people are trying to eat less sugar -- and some are trying to quit altogether. So why is it so hard to tame that sweet tooth?

Jenny and Lindsey dig into the ingredients that keep us chomping long past our necessary caloric intake: sugar, salt and fat. Jacqueline Raposo, a food writer and host of the "Love Bites" podcast, talks about the challenges of her month-long pledge to abstain from sugar. New York University nutrition professor and author of ``Soda Politics: Taking on Big Soda (and Winning)'' Marion Nestle explains why certain tastes appeal. Bestselling author and Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter Michael Moss and Bloomberg's Craig Giammona speak to the companies that rely on sugar, salt and fat to attract consumers and how Big Food and Big Soda are being forced to change tactics.

 

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