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Mapping How Clinton's 'Blue Wall' Came Down

Trump won the Rust Belt, and the presidency, by taking on longtime Democratic strongholds outside of big cities.
Hillary Clinton arrives at Gerald R. Ford International Airport in Grand Rapids, Michigan, the day before election night.
Hillary Clinton arrives at Gerald R. Ford International Airport in Grand Rapids, Michigan, the day before election night.Andrew Harnik/AP

The key to Trump’s victory? As our Atlantic colleague Ronald Brownstein observed before and after the election, the GOP nominee’s path to the White House involved breaching the “blue wall”—the reliably Democratic states of the industrial Northeast and upper Midwest. Pennsylvania and Michigan have each voted Democratic six consecutive times in general elections since 1996. In Wisconsin, it’s seven times since 1988. Trump turned them all, plus swing-state Ohio.

The maps below suggest how it happened. All in all, Clinton’s campaign held official events in just 14 states, according to the nonprofit FairVote, which has been tracking this year’s presidential campaign events. Nearly a quarter of that time was spent in Florida. In fact, Clinton was apparently so sure of her win in Wisconsin that she herself never once set foot there during her campaign.