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The View From Brexitland

If you’re American, perhaps you’re wondering if Britain’s Brexit experience could help you prepare for the coming months. Here’s what it’s been like in London.
A member of the extreme right, pro-Brexit English Defence League expresses support for Donald Trump at a demonstration in London.
A member of the extreme right, pro-Brexit English Defence League expresses support for Donald Trump at a demonstration in London.Hannah Mckay/Reuters

As a British person, the experience of waking up to find that Donald Trump had been elected president of the United States seemed freakishly familiar. Being shaken awake before dawn with shock news, then finding that most people I knew were awake, punch drunk, and already posting on social media—it all feels eerily reminiscent of June 24, when I also woke in the dark to find that Britain had narrowly voted for Brexit.

Many have already drawn parallels between Britain’s vote to leave the E.U. and the U.S. vote for Trump, not least because of some similarities in the metropolitan/rural divides in the two contests. It might also be true that the aftermath of Britain’s Brexit referendum could provide pointers as to how the next few months will be for Americans who did not vote for Trump.