Skip to content
CityLab
Economy

Where the Good Jobs Are

In the U.S., job growth continues to be concentrated in a small number of high-performing metros.
A mural depicting factory workers in the historic Pullman neighborhood in Chicago.
A mural depicting factory workers in the historic Pullman neighborhood in Chicago.Andrew Nelles/Reuters

The good news for this Labor Day weekend is that America is producing jobs. The bad news is that lots of them are low-wage jobs, and most of them are concentrated in a relatively small number of metro areas.

Those are the big takeaways from my detailed analysis of the geography of job growth in America’s 100 largest metros between 2011 and 2016, based on data from Josh Wright and his colleagues at the economic data and modeling firm Emsi. Taylor Blake of the Martin Prosperity Institute mapped the data.