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Is Tourism Spoiling Iceland?

The island nation’s visitor boom is putting its infrastructure under heavy stress, but some answers are on the way.
Eastern Iceland Borgarfjörður Eystri still receives few visitors, despite the tourism boom.
Eastern Iceland Borgarfjörður Eystri still receives few visitors, despite the tourism boom.Daniel Knieper/Flickr

Iceland may be beautiful, but it’s dangerously close to full. This is the message currently filtering out from the North Atlantic island as it struggles to absorb unprecedented numbers of visitors. Last year, the nation hosted 1.26 million tourists, a staggering number for a chilly island whose population barely scrapes past 330,000 citizens.

Those numbers are powered partly by a Game of Thrones Effect” that has seen fans of the TV series flock to its shooting locations. The 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, which has since become a tourist attraction, also helped to push up its profile as a vacation spot—perversely so, given that the eruption initially led to 107,000 flights across Europe being canceled. Given the rocky waters the country has been sailing through since the 2008 financial crisis, the revenue brought in by this spike in tourism is no doubt welcome. But the sheer volume of visitors to what was until recent decades a remote part of the world is still causing major stress. So how can Iceland keep welcoming people while making sure it isn’t trampled underfoot?