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Where New York Is Gentrifying and Where It Isn't

A new report from NYU’s Furman Center charts changes in neighborhoods over decades.
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Gentrification in New York City has surged over the past couple of decades as affluent residents, young empty-nesters, and the super-rich have flocked to the city. A report released on Monday by my colleagues at NYU’s Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy tracks the pattern of gentrification across 55 New York City neighborhoods, following changes in the age, income, and education of residents moving into and out of these neighborhoods, as well as the changes in housing prices and rents.

The report divides the city’s neighborhoods into three categories: gentrifying (those that were low-income in 1990 and experienced rent growth above the median between 1990 and 2010-2014), non-gentrifying (those that started off as low-income in 1990 but experienced more modest growth than gentrifying areas), and higher-income (those that had higher incomes in 1990 and thus were already gentrified).