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Islamic State Fears Lead U.S. Foreign Policy Concerns in Survey

  • Trump supporters question U.S. role in the global economy
  • U.S. membership in NATO attracts broad support in Pew poll
Iraqis look at the damage following a twin suicide bombing attack, claimed by the Islamic State (IS) group, in the southern Iraqi city of Samawah on May 1, 2016.

Iraqis look at the damage following a twin suicide bombing attack, claimed by the Islamic State (IS) group, in the southern Iraqi city of Samawah on May 1, 2016.

Photographer: HAIDAR HAMDANI/AFP/Getty Images

With the U.S. presidential election campaign firming up, four out of five Americans say the Islamic State is their top international concern, even as many remain wary of their country’s role overseas, according to a survey by the Pew Research Center.

Eighty percent of people polled cited the terrorist group, which has inspired attacks far from its base in Syria and Iraq, as a major threat to U.S. well-being. Yet the strategy over how to respond to it divides along party lines, Pew said in its report. Almost three-quarters of Republicans said they are concerned the U.S. won’t go far enough to stop the group, while 57 percent of Democrats say their bigger concern is that the U.S. will go too far militarily.