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Mapping the Resegregation of Diverse Neighborhoods in 4 U.S. Cities

Many areas that now seem integrated may not be that way for long, according to a new study.
The patterns of neighborhood change in and around New York City.
The patterns of neighborhood change in and around New York City.Michael Bader/American University

Neighborhood integration is a great goal, but just because a place is currently home to more than one race doesn’t mean it will retain this diversity in the decades to come. A new study published in Sociological Science explores this potential future for New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Houston. It finds that 35 percent of all neighborhoods in these cities—around 3,800 total—are likely to resegregate in the next two decades.

“Neighborhoods in many major metropolitan areas of the U.S. appear integrated, simply because different races are present,” Bader, who is an assistant professor of sociology at American University, said via press release. “But these neighborhoods are not the portrait of long-term, racially integrated neighborhoods.”