Photographer: Shah Marai/AFP via Getty Images

These Are Some of the Oddly Specific Jobs Tracked by the Government's Employment Report

Everything from bowling alley workers to celebrity agents.

Every month, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics releases an update on the employment picture across America.

While the headline figure of this report is widely watched, less known are the detailed jobs data that underpin it.

Here's a look at some of the weirdest occupations tracked by the BLS. The employment trends depicted here are varied, to say the least.

Taking flight

While the demand for aerospace staff did see a blip during the recession, the employment level has been somewhat stable more recently. 

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Emergencies Still Happen

It seems there's a continuous need for ambulance employees, and this chart shows a nearly uninterrupted move higher. 

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Celebrities Need Staff

All those big names seen on the screen or in a magazine aren't one-man (or woman) shows. Handling public figures is a growth industry.

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Art Tumbles

Art dealers were quick to lose their jobs at the onset of the recession, and the industry hasn't recovered since. 

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Baked Goods and Tortillas

While the industry turned lower in late 2008, there has been a huge move higher in the number of employees working at bakeries and tortillerias.

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Let's Grab a Beer

The growth rate for the number of people employed in the beer and ale industry has been hop-ing.

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Biotech Bubbles

If the biotech bubble is popping, it hasn't yet showed up in the jobs picture. The number of biotech employees has continued to climb.

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Into the Gutter

Bowling centers took a hit during the recession and continued lower thereafter. This one might just be a sign of the times.

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Are You Really Eating Less Chocolate?

A rather noisy chart. Either people are buying less chocolate, or it takes fewer people to make it these days. 

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Department Stores Get a Discount

Thanks to the rise of online shopping, head count at both high-end and discount stores has decreased.

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Eat Your Fruits and Veggies 

Jobs for fruit and vegetable canners are apparently far from stable. 

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Where's All the Foam?

There appears to have been a massive decline in the need for foam products during the recession, but the sector has quickly reinflated.

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Efficient Folding

Despite a continued climb in the number of items shipped in recent years, it appears that folding specialists are either becoming more efficient or being replaced by robots. 

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Hazardous Waste Is a Hazardous Industry

Not only is the chart all over the place, but the general trend is clearly to the downside when it comes to hazardous waste employees. 

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Soda Industry Slims Down

Perhaps the continued shaming of soda, including the diet variety, is best told through this chart. The number of staff working in soft drinks and ice has taken a major hit. Not even Taylor Swift's Diet Coke sponsorship seems to have helped. 

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Independence Rules

Freelancing is clearly on the rise. The number of jobs in this area is now higher than it has ever been over the past decade. 

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Building From the Ground Up

When the real estate market took a big hit, so did the number of people needed to make building components.

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Not So Fast

Based on this chart, it looks as if people aren't going to the race track much anymore.

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Thingamajigs 

Demand for people making "special tools dies jigs and fixtures" appears to have stabilized after taking quite a hit. 

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Kudos to the BLS for granularity.

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