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How the Party of Jeb Bush and Scott Walker Helped Create Donald Trump

We're now living in a world where Club for Growth attacks anti-establishment candidates.
MOBILE, AL- AUGUST 21: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets supporters after his rally at Ladd-Peebles Stadium on August 21, 2015 in Mobile, Alabama. The Trump campaign moved tonight's rally to a larger stadium to accommodate demand.

MOBILE, AL- AUGUST 21: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets supporters after his rally at Ladd-Peebles Stadium on August 21, 2015 in Mobile, Alabama. The Trump campaign moved tonight's rally to a larger stadium to accommodate demand.

Photographer: Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images

David Bettinger, a 65-year-old retiree in New Hampshire with bushy white hair and a mustache to match, isn't sure yet which Republican presidential candidate he'll support. “I know who I'm not for,” he counters. “It's an obvious answer: Trump.”

Except it's not at all obvious. Donald Trump is the most easily mocked Republican contender (Bettinger compares him to an equine's backside) and probably the most divisive. But the New York billionaire sits atop every public poll and has a double-digit lead in New Hampshire. “A lot of that's because a lot of people from Massachusetts moved up here, and they don't know any better,“ says Bettinger.