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Yes, Some Students Are Throwing Out Their School Lunch Veggies

But that doesn’t mean Congress should throw out healthier eating standards.
relates to Yes, Some Students Are Throwing Out Their School Lunch Veggies
Courtesy of Sarah Amin

Fun fact: Congress passed the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) in 1946, after a federal investigation concluded many young men had failed to pass draft requirements as a result of childhood malnutrition. Serving meals in schools was a “measure of national security, to safeguard the health and well-being of the Nation’s children.”

School lunches have since become much more than a wartime bolster. In recent decades, they’ve become a life raft for kids hovering around the poverty line. Yet many schools have continued to cook to 1940s-era health standards, despite the current obesity epidemic and the fact that many children, particularly those from low-income backgrounds, are less exposed to fresh home-cooked meals (which are associated with higher intake of fruits and vegetables) than in decades past. When the 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act overhauled the NSLP, changes were long overdue.