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How New York, Chicago, and L.A. Explain the 1960s and '70s

The City Lost and Found explores a turbulent time in the U.S. by looking to the country's three largest cities.
Bruce Davidson, Untitled, from "East 100th Street", 1966– 68. Gelatin silver print. Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York. © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery.
Bruce Davidson, Untitled, from "East 100th Street", 1966– 68. Gelatin silver print. Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York. © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery.

U.S. cities witnessed incredible physical and social change between the presidencies of John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan. In a span of two decades, the federal government's War on Poverty was born, whittled down, and effectively neutered all while the communities it served reckoned with the decline of industry and the increasingly dominant role of real estate and finance in urban development.

From Boston to Seattle, any major American city could serve as a case study on this especially turbulent period, but a current exhibit and its corresponding book submit that we need look no further than the country's three largest metropolises.