Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg Business
Watches

Eight Incredible Dress Watches From Baselworld 2015

Elegant timepieces from Patek Philippe, Girard-Perregaux, Nomos, Seiko, Zenith, and Omega caught our eye

There's literally a watch for every type of person at the Baselworld watch expo. (Including the type you want to stay far, far away from.) For those who like a classier, more elegant timepiece, the brands this year are offering up a ton of new options that will look great with that bespoke jacket. Whether you're looking for a modest steel timekeeper or a full-on perpetual calendar, we've got you covered. Here are eight of the best dress watches from Baselworld 2015.

Nomos Tangente Automatik

An ultraslim automatic movement makes the Tangete Automatik possible.

An ultraslim automatic movement makes the Tangete Automatik possible.

Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg Business

While Nomos has long had the Tangomat for those looking for an automatic alternative to the manually wound Tangente, it's always come at the expense of slimness. The Tangente Automatik uses a brand new ultrathin automatic movement, the DUW 3001, that incorporates Nomos's in-house escapement and is only .3mm thicker than the manual watch. The red accents on the dial look lovely and distinguish it just enough from its manual sibling. $3,780

Grand Seiko 62GS

Grand Seiko does understatement very, very well.
Grand Seiko does understatement very, very well.
Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg Business

It's the 55th anniversary of Grand Seiko, so the Japanese watchmaker dug into the archive and designed this watch with details taken from the early models. The case has a slide tonneau curve to it, faceted lugs, and no bezel at all. It's a watch that's all about little subtleties, and those who get it will get it, and those do don't probably never will. In stainless steel (a limited edition of 600 pieces), it's wonderfully understated, but I couldn't blame you for reaching for one of the gold options (each color limited to 100 pieces). $4,300 (steel), $16,300 (yellow and rose gold), $17,200 (white gold)

Girard-Perregaux 1966 Large Date 

The 1966 has a patented date mechanism that uses two discs, one transparent.
The 1966 has a patented date mechanism that uses two discs, one transparent.
Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg Business

This looks like a pure, classic dress watch. There's the moonphase tucked into the subdial at 6 o'clock, leaf-shaped hands, and an easy-to-read date at 12 o'clock. But Girard-Perregaux added its own twist by making the large date a composite of an opaque disk and a transparent disc (so it looks like one instead of two) and placing little slivers of luminous phosphorescence into the hands for reading at night. It's a slightly younger take on an old standby. $24,360 (rose gold), $26,060 (white gold)

Zenith Elite 6150

It's simple on the outside but not under the hood.

It's simple on the outside but not under the hood.

Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg Business

It doesn't get much simpler than this. The slim steel case looks even slimmer because of its 42mm diameter, and the brushed metal dial has a slightly industrial-chic quality to it. The newly reworked Elite movement inside provides a startling 100 hours of power reserve and shows that Zenith can do more than just make edgy chronographs and big pilot's watches. $8,300

Patek Philippe Ref. 5940G

It's an unusual shape but incredible once you get used to it.

It's an unusual shape but incredible once you get used to it.

Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg Business

Patek released more complicated watches than this one this week, but none as purely elegant. The TV-set shape might take some getting used to if you're not familiar with it, but after a few minutes it will seem as natural as a round watch. The full perpetual calendar is wound by a micro-rotor visible on the back, which is pure Patek, and the combination of black dial and white gold case makes it feel very 2015. You can keep your split-second chronographs and minute repeaters; this is the new Patek I'm dreaming of. $87,200

Omega Globemaster

This is a new level of movement-making for Omega.

This is a new level of movement-making for Omega.

Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent

The flashy Whatever Side of the Moon chronographs get all the attention at Omega (more on those later), but it's the Globermaster that the brand's most important watch. No question about it. The movement is anti-shock, anti-magnet, and anti-anything else you can think of and is the first Omega to achieve Master Chronometer certification. The 39mm size is close to perfect, and the pie-pan style dials (named for the sloping side that resemble, well, you know) are a throwback to vintage Omega dress watches. The Globemaster comes in a variety of metals and colors, so everyone can find one they like.  From $7,700

Georg Jensen Annual Calendar

The Georg Jensen annual calendar is a little strange, but great.
The Georg Jensen annual calendar is a little strange, but great.
Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg Business

This watch is a strange one, but I really like it. A lot of negative space is on the dial, the month indicator and seconds seem a little unbalanced, and the hands are whip thin. The 41mm case, on the other hand, is a little large and thick, but it wears better than I had expected. Snobs might scoff that the movement isn't made in-house by Georg Jensen, but design this good paired with an annual calendar priced at less than $6,000 deserves to be applauded. $5,950

Laurent Ferrier Galet Square

The Galet Square is a new shape for Laurent Ferrier.
The Galet Square is a new shape for Laurent Ferrier.
Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg Business

The Galet Square uses a curved cushion case (quite different from, say, Vacheron Constantin's Harmony watches), and it's the first nonround watch from former Patek maker Laurent Ferrier. There are a few dial colors, including gold, blue, and brown, with varying degrees of understated markings. Styling aside, it still uses Laurent Ferrier's micro-rotor movement, possibly the most beautiful automatic movement ever made. Rose gold is fine and all, but a watch this smart in stainless steel is pure cool. From $39,500

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