What You’ll Be Wearing Next Fall: 7 Trends From Milan Fashion Week

Style points to take stock of now

Top trends at Milan Fashion Week menswear shows, Fall/Winter 2015

Photographer: (clockwise from top left) Victor Boyko/Getty Images; Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images (2); Tullio M. Puglia/Getty Images; Bally via Bloomberg; Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images; Boglioli via Bloomberg

So that happened. And no, I’m not referring to that gender-confusing Gucci collection, the first post-Frida Giannini. (Or am I? It was actually pretty beautiful.) I meant, Milan Fashion Week is a wrap. But before I catch this flight to Paris to discover the French capital’s fashion offerings, here's a list of which Italian trends are worth taking home with us (in addition to that bag of cannoli I plan to polish off before the Valentino show, oops).

And guys, follow us on our new Twitter handle @luxury—like these styling lessons and fall wardrobe suggestions, you'll be right on trend.

Sartorial Casual

From left: Canali, Bottega Veneta, Canali

From left: Canali, Bottega Veneta, Canali

Photographer: (from left) Victor Boyko/Getty Images; Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images; Victor Boyko/Getty Images

Effortless cool,  comfort chic—it all means the same thing: Dress down to dress up. Look good, but be comfortable. This reimagined formality, which is anchored by lived-in, inventive layering, was seen at shows from Bottega Veneta to Canali and Salvatore Ferragamo. To create the look, start with a fine-gauge turtleneck, gray flannel trousers, and a killer piece of outerwear (like a fitted shearling bomber or oversize double-breasted coat).  

Belts

From left: Brioni, John Varvatos, Brioni

From left: Brioni, John Varvatos, Brioni

Photographer: (from left) Brioni via Bloomberg; Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images; Brioni via Bloomberg

You’ve been warned, fellas: Cinched waists are not just for the ladies anymore. Designers highlighted slimmed-down silhouettes (and torsos) with belts on everything from herringbone topcoats, sporty trenches, and even shortened-up double-breasted wool blends.  

Brown

From left: John Varvatos, Etro, Marc Jacobs

From left: John Varvatos, Etro, Marc Jacobs

Photographer: (from left) Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images; Victor Boyko/Getty Images; Arno Frugier/Marc Jacobs via Bloomberg

Browns were paired with black, blue, and every color in between—and often shown layered on top of each other in varying shades and textures. Think nutty colors, like chestnut, or with tinges of red in a rusty hue. 

 Statement Sweaters

From left: Neil Barrett, Dolce & Gabbana, Neil Barrett

From left: Neil Barrett, Dolce & Gabbana, Neil Barrett

Photographer: (from left) Tullio M. Puglia/Getty Images; Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images; Tullio M. Puglia/Getty Images

Graphic knits are an easy way to make a subtle-yet-strong statement. Neil Barrett, who is famous for his lightning bolt and color-block knits and shirts, introduced a shooting-star graphic this season, while Dolce & Gabbana screen-printed family portraits, creating a strong emotional statement.

Covered Necks 

From left: Salvatore Ferragamo, Bally

From left: Salvatore Ferragamo, Bally

Photographer: (from left) Antonio de Moraes Barros Filho/WireImage; Bally via Bloomberg

We noticed a … well, trend in many of the trends: no neck cleavage. Whether by a chunky turtleneck or oversize cashmere scarf, ascots, and even those ruffled, high-neck blouses at Gucci and Marc Jacobs, covering below your chin will certainly be a common (even popular) way of accessorizing come fall. 

Wide-Wale Cords

From left: Boglioli, Fendi

From left: Boglioli, Fendi

Photographer: (from left) Boglioli via Bloomberg; Catwalking/Getty Images

The least formal (and also softest) player in the corduroy family is back in a big way. This is actually great. The thicker-ridged cord is also the easiest way to show texture when playing with those additional layers next season, especially when they're monochromatic.

 Primary Colors 

From left: Gucci, Michael Bastian

From left: Gucci, Michael Bastian

Photographer: (from left) Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images; Michael Bastian via Bloomberg

Sure, there were shades of gray and jewel tones aplenty in Milan, but there were also pops of color from bright mustard yellow to royal blue and traffic light red (as in Michael Bastian’s case). Good news: All of them go good with gray—so basically the entire Calvin Klein collection.

Nic Screws is the style director at Bloomberg and has been reporting from Europe's menswear shows all month. Follow her on Instagram and Twitter and Bloomberg Pursuits on its new Twitter handle, @luxury.

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