Runway vs. Reality: Can You Wear the Baggy Pants From Milan Fashion Week?

Brands such as Gucci, Giorgio Armani, and Versace all cut a wider swath down the runway this year. But should you follow?

Loose fits at Milan Fashion Week F/W 2015: baggy pants paired with a blouse from Gucci, and a monochromatic slightly oversized suit by Versace.

Source: Versace via Bloomberg Gucci; Catwalking/Getty Images

Today is officially the first day of Paris Fashion Week, but before we get to the Parisians we are going to play our reality vs. runway game with the Italians one last time. (Previous editions: fur and oversize scarfs.)

Fit is important, you know that by now. But a lot of the shows in Milan played games with volume this year—there were pleats, harem pants, and some pants that flowed down the runway looked almost like skirts. (We do not advocate this look.) Giorgio Armani, Bottega Veneta, and Gucci are a few of the brands that showcased roomy trousers, and even within one collection there were sometimes pairs of pants that made sense and some that defied understanding. (And sometimes gravity. How do those stay up without a belt?)

Here's a little primer on how to navigate this new style.

Trend: Baggy-fit pants

Loose fits at Milan Fashion Week F/W 2015: baggy pants paired with a blouse from Gucci, and a monochromatic slightly oversized suit by Versace.

Loose fits at Milan Fashion Week, Fall/Winter 2015: baggy pants paired with a blouse from Gucci, and a monochromatic, slightly oversize suit by Versace.

Source: Versace via Bloomberg Gucci; Catwalking/Getty Images

Donatella Versace is known for her over-the-top creative designs, and although we might not agree with her all the time, we can safely say that Versace did the baggy silhouettes best. For one thing, the fashion house showed monochromatic looks, and in general wearing an outfit of all the same color will slim you down. (Versace has been in the game long enough to know this.) At first glance the above look may not read "baggy," but in the context of recent skintight menswear and tailoring trends, that eggplant-colored suit is downright boxy. 

On the other end of the spectrum, Gucci showed a collection that played a lot with androgyny and volume.  The show featured rich colors, blouses (that was not a typo), ascots, and a killer red duffle coat. For a men's collection it was deliberately flouncy and effeminate, and felt a bit like it was designed for a Parisian artist in a garret in Montmartre. And unlike Versace, which selected its usual well-built male models, the waifish boys (and occasional women) selected by Gucci looked like children playing dress-up in their father's (and occasionally mother's) clothes. This is not the look for you, no matter how sharp your cheekbones are.

And while we're at it, we 100 percent do not endorse blouses for fall 2015, or ever.

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