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The Chart That Should Worry U.S. Tech Even More About the Snowden Effect

American National Security Agency (NSA) whistleblower Edward Snowden speaks to European officials via videoconference during a parliamentary hearing on mass surveillance at the European Council in Strasbourg, eastern France, on April 8, 2014. Snowden pleaded for new international norms on surveillance, to avoid the kinds of abuses committed by the NSA, especially as high-tech surveillance practices become widespread worldwide. FREDERICK FLORIN/AFP/Getty Images
American National Security Agency (NSA) whistleblower Edward Snowden speaks to European officials via videoconference during a parliamentary hearing on mass surveillance at the European Council in Strasbourg, eastern France, on April 8, 2014. Snowden pleaded for new international norms on surveillance, to avoid the kinds of abuses committed by the NSA, especially as high-tech surveillance practices become widespread worldwide. FREDERICK FLORIN/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. technology companies have a lot to fear from the fallout over the widespread spying by the National Security Agency. Corporate customers ripping out their products from data centers around the world isn't one of them.

The real threat? Projects just getting off the ground. A $185-million submarine data cable that Brazil is building to Europe - which the country says can be built without U.S. technologies - offers one example, which we reported on today.