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Why the Mets Are Right to Save the New York State Pavilion

With change in Queens arriving rapidly, the Mets can preserve a piece of team history—and public good will—by helping to restore a part of the World's Fair from 50 years ago.
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Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

Buy a ticket to see the Mets take on the Giants on Friday, and you'll be giving directly to preserve an architectural giant. No, not Citi Fieldcertainly not Citi Field. That's the Queens ballpark that, according to The New Yorker, was erected as a temple to the Brooklyn Dodgers. The same ballpark that Deadspin describes as "a monument to the Mets' modern futility and clumsiness."

Unfortunately, it is much too late to save Shea Stadium. But for every ticket that sells on Friday, the Mets will give $5 to People for the Pavilion, an organization that is working to save the New York State Pavilion, the Philip Johnson–designed marvel and one of the few remaining vestiges of the 1964–65 World's Fair. The Pavilion opened to the world in April 1964, just five days after the Mets lost to the Pirates in their first game at Shea Stadium.