Skip to content
Subscriber Only

A Burger Chain Taps Local Farms to Sell More Franchises

B.good assistant manager Rui Macedo harvests collard greens from the roof of one of the chain's Boston locations.
B.good assistant manager Rui Macedo harvests collard greens from the roof of one of the chain's Boston locations.Photograph by Matt Kalinowski/b.good LLC

Franchise restaurant success usually starts with cutting operational costs and purchasing in bulk from national suppliers. The savings that come from volume and standardization are then funneled into mammoth ad campaigns that send Americans flocking to new outlets.

Jon Olinto, co-founder of Boston’s b.good, thinks his burger chain can break that mold. As at his flagship in Boston’s financial district, his restaurants feature seasonal menus, farm-to-table produce, and made-from-scratch condiments and salad dressings. B.good’s fries are cut from whole potatoes and its meat patties are ground on site. The seasonal menu features peaches, tomatoes, and corn in summer, and green chiles, cauliflower, and apple shakes in the fall.