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In 2013 Hurricane Season, a Remarkable Calm Before the Next Storm

Rescuer Joshua Barbot hauls members of the Trumbaturi family from their flooded home in Slidell, La., in August 2012
Rescuer Joshua Barbot hauls members of the Trumbaturi family from their flooded home in Slidell, La., in August 2012Photograph by Mario Tama/Getty Images

A year after Hurricane Sandy unleashed superlatives, demolishing communities across New Jersey and New York, the current Atlantic cyclone season is turning into a meteorological bust of near-record proportions. There have been no Atlantic hurricanes through Sept. 4 and only a half dozen tropical storms, with conditions over the next week predicted to be about the same as they have been over the past three months: unfavorable to formation.

Hurricane season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30, with most of the stronger storms typically developing in September and October. In 2002, Gustav strengthened into that year’s first hurricane on Sept. 11, according to forecasting firm AccuWeather. Before then, the latest first hurricane of a season arrived on Sept. 16—72 years ago, during World War II. This year, the strongest system has been Tropical Storm Andrea, which moved across Florida, Georgia, and the Carolinas from June 5 to June 7 and caused flooding.