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Telling Tech Companies to Save Us From Our Love for Porn

Telling Tech Companies to Save Us From Our Love for Porn
Photograph by Nicole Waring/Getty Images

A man sued Apple last month, saying the company should be held responsible for not protecting him from impulses to use his laptop to look at pornography, which is kind of like suing Ford for making the car that you drove to a massage parlor. Furthermore, he argued, Apple should be legally required to block pornographic content on its Web browsers. The concept is enjoyably ridiculous—and would be even more so if its main demand weren’t also essentially becoming public policy in Britain.

Chris Sevier, a Nashville resident, bought a MacBook to produce music for his electronic group, Ghost WARS, and maybe browse the Web, according to the lawsuit. He had lived a smut-free existence until he mistyped “facebook.com,” and ended up on a social network for swingers that goes by a very similar name. It was full of “images that appealed to his biological sensibilities as a male.” Sevier wrote that he developed such an intense interest in pornography that he lost interest in having sex with his wife, and his marriage fell apart.