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Secrets, Lies, and Missing Data: New Twists in the Keystone XL Pipeline

Construction of the Gulf Coast Project in Prague, Oklahoma, part of the Keystone XL Pipeline Project
Construction of the Gulf Coast Project in Prague, Oklahoma, part of the Keystone XL Pipeline ProjectPhotograph by Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

Even if you haven’t been following the saga of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, and haven’t decided if it’s a fast track to U.S. energy independence (those in favor) or “game over” for human civilization (those opposed, because of its role in climate change), yesterday’s developments are too rich to ignore. In fact, it may be game over for the Keystone XL—at least until 2016—thanks, once again, to U.S. State Department oversight.

First, a refresher: Because the proposed line crosses the Canada-U.S. border, TransCanada, the Calgary-based company that wants to build and operate the pipeline, needs President Obama’s approval. The president, in turn, is relying on State to assess the viability and safety of the plan, as he indicated in a speech a little over a week ago. “The State Department is going through the final stages of evaluating the proposal,” Obama said, sweating profusely at Georgetown University. ”That’s how it’s always been done.”