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Egypt's Anger Reaches a Tourist Haven

Egyptian opposition protesters celebrate on July 1, 2013 in Cairo's landmark Tahrir square
Egyptian opposition protesters celebrate on July 1, 2013 in Cairo's landmark Tahrir squarePhotograph by Gianluigi Guercia/AFP via Getty Images

In a parking lot in the center of Naama Bay, part of Egypt’s famous Sharm el-Sheikh resort, several hundred protesters chanted along with a man on a small wooden stage festooned with Egyptian flags. Holding pictures of Mohammed Morsi, Egypt’s first democratically elected president, with a red X over his face, the protesters demanded he leave office on the anniversary of his first year in power. The mood was ebullient. About 100 feet away, on the shore of the Red Sea, foreign tourists nonchalantly ate dinner outside their hotel.

It was quite a contrast with Cairo. In the capital city, the Muslim Brotherhood headquarters was ransacked overnight. Eight people were killed and 45 injured. Six others were killed across the country. The Egyptian army gave the nation’s leaders 48 hours to resolve the crisis or it would implement a “road map” for the future, adding that it would not directly involve itself in government or politics. Many interpreted the statement as a warning that a coup was possible.