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More Losers Than Winners in America's New Economic Geography

It appears that talent clustering provides little in the way of trickle-down benefits to service and blue-collar workers.
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The past couple of decades have seen America sort itself into two distinct nations, as the more highly skilled and affluent have migrated to a relatively small number of cities and metro areas.

"The highly educated cluster around a few small nodes," writes David Brooks in The New York Times last week. "Decade after decade, smart and educated people flock away from Merced, Calif., Yuma, Ariz., Flint, Mich., and Vineland, N.J. In those places, less than 15 percent of the residents have college degrees. They flock to Washington, Boston, San Jose, Raleigh-Durham and San Francisco. In those places, nearly 50 percent of the residents have college degrees."