What Would a Music Label Pay to Sign Pussy Riot?

Members of a female punk band 'Pussy Riot' Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, Maria Alyokhina, and Yekaterina Samutsevich, sit inside a glass enclosure during a court hearing in Moscow. Photograph by Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/Getty Images

During her live concert in Moscow last night, Madonna stopped singing, slipped on a balaclava, and launched into a lecture in which she expressed her disapproval of the incarceration and ongoing trial of a local punk group called Pussy Riot. Madonna joined such high-profile artists as Red Hot Chili Peppers and Sting in support of the outfit, whose staunchly anti-Putin members face charges of “hooliganism” and inciting “religious hatred” after an impromptu protest performance at a cathedral in February. Detained throughout a trial this summer, Pussy Riot now await their verdict, expected to be handed down next Friday. The prosecutor is calling for a three-year sentence.

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