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Ray Bradbury's Vision of the Dystopian City

As early as 1951, the late author feared America's cities would become places where someone taking a simple walk down the street would be greeted with suspicion.
relates to Ray Bradbury's Vision of the Dystopian City
Internet Archive

In 1951, the late, great Ray Bradbury published a short story titled "The Pedestrian." In it, we encounter a character named Leonard Mead doing something very odd in his future society: walking. The year is 2053 and in his city of 3 million, the streets are quiet, "not unequal to walking through a graveyard." Foreshadowing themes that would later turn up in Bradbury's most famous novel, Fahrenheit 451, we get the sense that Mead's fellow urbanites are busy watching TV. "Was that a murmur of laughter from within a moon-white house?" the protagonist asks as he passes the homes of his neighbors. 

But Mead loved to walk, even though "in ten years of walking by night or day, for thousands of miles, he had never met another person walking, not once in all that time." We quickly find out why: