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Duff McKagan, Guns N’ Capital

Former Guns N’ Roses bassist Duff McKagan moonlights as an investment guru

Business majors can party. They can get wasted, wake up the next morning, hit 18 holes, and still make afternoon classes. But few have the expertise of Duff McKagan, bassist for Guns N’ Roses and Velvet Revolver, and student at the Albers School of Business and Economics at Seattle University. In his autobiography, It’s So Easy: And Other Lies, McKagan, 47, explains how he stopped his gallon-of-vodka-a-day habit by switching to 10 bottles of wine. How he drank his own vomit, because it had alcohol in it. How he used cocaine just so he could drink more. How he drank so much beer at one point that Guns N’ Roses lead singer Axl Rose introduced him as “The King of Beers” and a producer from The Simpsons called to ask if he could name the show’s beer, Duff, after him, which they did. How his pancreas basically exploded, causing third-degree burns on his other internal organs. He also gives the reader helpful tips, such as buying tetracycline in the fish section of the pet store as a cheap antibiotic cure for venereal disease and how to rebalance an investment portfolio.

After his emergency room hospitalization for acute pancreatitis at age 30, McKagan quit drinking, started mountain biking, trained in a martial art called ukidokan, lost 50 pounds, and learned to read his Guns N’ Roses profit-and-loss statements. Soon he figured out that despite listed expenses such as yachts and private jets, he wasn’t in bad financial shape. That’s because the profit side of the ledger showed that Guns N’ Roses released the most successful debut album ever.