Wait til the fourth quarter to flush

Halftime at the Superbowl is the sewage industry's version of the Y2K crunch. Without dwelling on details, all hell could break loose. Or worse, I guess, not break loose. Here's the part that fascinates me:
Stephen Baker

Halftime at the Superbowl is the sewage industry's version of the Y2K crunch. Without dwelling on details, all hell could break loose. Or worse, I guess, not break loose. Here's the part that fascinates me: "Nationwide, as fans rush to go before the Super Bowl's second-half kickoff, they'll flush enough water to fall over Niagara Falls for 39 minutes."

Now if we can create (a rank) Niagara Falls just by flushing in unison, don't the 300 million of us, working together, have the power to create alternative forms of energy? I'm only half kidding. What happens if each one of us turns off one light bulb, walks instead of drives once a week for groceries, etc. These are small things, but multiply each gesture by 100 million and they start looking huge.

Before it's here, it's on the Bloomberg Terminal.
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