Internet wiretapping in an age of terror

The Electronic Frontier Foundation is calling for an Internet-wide blogger's rights campaing. You can join by clicking here. The purpose of the campaign is to wage
Steve Rosenbush

The Electronic Frontier Foundation is calling for an Internet-wide blogger's rights campaing. You can join by clicking here. The purpose of the campaign is to wage "a fight for free expression, political speech, and the right to anonymity online."

I'm behind the campaign, but with one major exception. The EFF and other groups want the government to suspend new Internet wiretap rules. I can well understand why people are so opposed to the concept of the government monitoring the computer usage of citizens and U.S. residents. I understand that it places enormous power in the hands of the government, and that the wiretaps could be abused by political or economic interests. That will remain a risk, as long as the government is subject to corruption. But we have lived with wiretapping and its potential abuse for a long time. Surveillance plays a legitimate and crucial role in criminal justice and national security. Do we really want to cripple government surveillance in an age of terror? Or should we sanction government surveillance, managing it as closely as possible but accepting the fact that we can't eliminate the risk of abuse. This is a tough one for me. What do people think?

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