Table: Mobilizing for War at Home

NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

With 103 active private nuclear plants and 45,000 tons of radioactive spent fuel, a terrorist act could have catastrophic consequences. The Administration has instituted no-fly zones above plants, while companies are hiring more guards.

INFRASTRUCTURE

Oil and gas lines, bridges, roads, tunnels, ports, public arenas, and office buildings are all vulnerable to attack. Authorities are responding with increased police patrols while private companies beef up their own security.

TRANSPORTATION

Airport and airplane security remain weak. Many railroad stations are now under surveillance, but tracks are open to attack. Legislation requiring better-trained airport-security workers will help, but railroads remain largely unprotected.

BIOTERRORISM

Washington is stockpiling vaccines and drugs and boosting research into new detection devices and treatments. Also, it is beefing up training for emergency response teams. Still, adequate vaccine supplies are at least a year away.

TELECOM & CYBERTERRORISM

Although terrorists use wireless and the Internet to plot attacks, they could also target those networks. The Feds and telcos are creating plans to share backup networks. And they are strengthening computer firewalls and virus scanning.

POLICING THE BORDER

America's 4,000-mile borders with Canada and Mexico remain porous. The Administration is adding inspectors and patrol agents, going after foreign students who overstay their visas, and coordinating policies with Mexico and Canada.

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