This Sign Of The Times Says `Help Wanted'

IT'S 'FULL SPEED AHEAD' AT NISSAN

For Nissan Motor Corp., 1991 was nothing to brag about. Its U.S. auto sales dropped 7% in the first 11 months, and prospects this year don't look much better. Even so, the Smyrna (Tenn.) auto maker, the first Japanese transplant in the U.S., is adding a $490 million assembly line to make a midsize Stanza sedan by summer. That will raise capacity at Smyrna to 450,000 vehicles a year. Nissan has added 700 workers for the new line and will hire an additional 1,000, raising total employment to 6,000.

To continue reading this article you must be a Bloomberg Professional Service Subscriber.