Wyoming

Snapshot: Wyoming has a poor score for ease of voting and middling scores for ballot security and how elected officials responded to claims about the 2020 election.

Ease of Voting

Some measures to expand access
3 out of 7 benchmarks

Ballot Security

Some measures to ensure accuracy and security
5 out of 8 benchmarks

What Politicians Say

Few responses that undermined the 2020 election
3 out of 4 benchmarks

The state added a voter ID requirement after the 2020 elections.

Voters had previously been required to show ID when registering. The new law requires they present “acceptable identification” when casting a ballot during the early voting period or on Election Day.

Accepted forms of ID include a driver’s license, other state or tribal ID, US passport, military ID, public school, community college or University of Wyoming ID; or a Medicaid or Medicare insurance card.

Voters who do not have ID can cast a provisional ballot. Nationally, as many as 3 in 10 provisional ballots are not counted.

For vote-by-mail, the law requires voters either register in person or include a copy of their ID when sending in their registration.


Ease of Voting

Is the state making it easy for eligible voters to register and cast a ballot?
Met 0 out of 0 benchmarks
How Wyoming compares to other states
Wyoming
Other states
← Easier to vote
Harder →
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Number of total benchmarks met

The law also waives the $10 fee for a state ID card at the Department of Motor Vehicles if the person states that they are only using it to vote.

It also requires that notices the DMV sends about ID cards that are about to expire to include a reminder about the voter ID requirement.


Ballot Security

Is the state following best practices to ensure ballot counting is accurate and timely?
Met 0 out of 0 benchmarks
How Wyoming compares to other states
Wyoming
Other states
← More secure
Less secure →
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Number of total benchmarks met

A 2022 law allows local elections administrators to begin processing mail ballots the Thursday before the election and makes it a felony punishable by up to five years in prison and $10,000 in fines to release any results until polls close on Election Day.


How Politicians Responded to the 2020 Election

What did the state do in the aftermath of Trump's defeat?
Met 0 out of 0 benchmarks
How Wyoming compares to other states
Wyoming
Other states
← Fewer efforts to undermine 2020 election
More →
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Number of total benchmarks met

Governor Mark Gordon supported a Texas lawsuit asking the Supreme Court to intervene in the election, asking Attorney General Bridget Hill to look into the case.

He said that the two of them decided not to join because the lawsuit could have “unintended consequences” for states running their own elections, but if the Supreme Court took up the case they would submit a “suitable and appropriate” comment then.

US Senator Cynthia Lummis objected to the certification of Biden electors from Pennsylvania.

The state’s lone US Representative, Liz Cheney, has been a leading Republican voice against Trump’s baseless claims of widespread fraud, serving as vice chair on a House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol.

She lost the August primary to Harriet Hageman, who said the 2020 election was “rigged.”

Republican Secretary of State nominee Chuck Gray has said “the woke, big tech left” steals elections.


Read the full methodology
Story by: Ryan Teague Beckwith and Bill Allison
Graphics by: Paul Murray, Allison McCartney and Mira Rojanasakul
With assistance by: Rachael Dottle, Marie Patino, Jenny Zhang, Gregory Korte, Romy Varghese, Vincent Del Giudice, Nathan Crooks, Margaret Newkirk, Shruti Date Singh, David Welch, Elise Young, Dina Bass, Brendan Walsh, Carey Goldberg and Maria Wood
Editors: Wendy Benjaminson, Wes Kosova, Alex Tribou and Yue Qiu
Photo editors: Eugene Reznik, Marisa Gertz and Maria Wood
Photo credits: Getty Images, Bloomberg and AP Photo