Indiana

Snapshot: Indiana has middling scores for ease of voting and ballot security and some concerns about how its elected officials responded to claims about the 2020 election.

Ease of Voting

Some measures to expand access
4 out of 7 benchmarks

Ballot Security

Some measures to ensure accuracy and security
5 out of 8 benchmarks

What Politicians Say

Several responses that undermined the 2020 election
2 out of 4 benchmarks

It is one of six states that still use touchscreen voting equipment that election security experts say is fundamentally flawed.

According to the nonpartisan Verified Voting Foundation, more than 40% of voting machines in Indiana do not produce a paper record of the vote, the fourth-highest percentage among US states.

That can cause problems when aging touchscreens aren’t calibrated correctly, causing the machine to make the wrong selection.

Voters can fix the problem if they notice it, but election security experts recommend either eliminating touchscreens or adding a paper record sort of like a grocery-store receipt that voters can use to confirm their choices.

In 2022, Republican Governor Eric Holcomb signed a bill that would require all voting machines to have a paper receipt by the 2024 general election, and Secretary of State Holli Sullivan is spending millions to send new equipment to counties.

In June, former elections staffer Diego Morales defeated Sullivan for the Republican nomination for secretary of state. Morales has called the 2020 election a “scam” and pledged to investigate “shenanigans” but he has said that Biden was legitimately elected.


Ease of Voting

Is the state making it easy for eligible voters to register and cast a ballot?
Met 0 out of 0 benchmarks
How Indiana compares to other states
Indiana
Other states
← Easier to vote
Harder →
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Number of total benchmarks met

Republican officials loosened the rules around voting by mail for the 2020 primaries amid the coronavirus pandemic, but tightened them again for the general election, despite a surge in voting by mail.

One of 17 states that require an excuse to vote by mail, Indiana allowed anyone to ask for a mail-in ballot for the June 2020 primary, leading to three times as many requests as usual. The state also allowed voters to request a mail-in ballot online for the first time.

Though some state Republicans pushed to make the expansion permanent, Holcomb said it was no longer necessary because lockdown orders were no longer in effect.

Online requests for a ballot are still allowed, but voters must now confirm their identity using the last four digits of their Social Security number or their driver’s license number.


Ballot Security

Is the state following best practices to ensure ballot counting is accurate and timely?
Met 0 out of 0 benchmarks
How Indiana compares to other states
Indiana
Other states
← More secure
Less secure →
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Number of total benchmarks met

Indiana counties now have until the 2024 general election to upgrade elections equipment to provide a paper receipt to voters using touch-screen voting machines.

The Indiana League of Women Voters opposed the bill, saying that it would prefer that the state get rid of touch-screen monitors entirely, rather than add paper receipts.

The law also extended a cybersecurity agreement between counties and the secretary of state’s office to 2028.


How Politicians Responded to the 2020 Election

What did the state do in the aftermath of Trump's defeat?
Met 0 out of 0 benchmarks
How Indiana compares to other states
Indiana
Other states
← Fewer efforts to undermine 2020 election
More →
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Number of total benchmarks met

Indiana was one of 18 states that backed the Texas lawsuit asking the Supreme Court to intervene in the election, with outgoing Attorney General Curtis Hill and his successor, Todd Rokita, both supporting the effort.

Three of Indiana’s seven Republican US representatives objected to certifying Biden electors from Arizona, and four objected to Pennsylvania. Five signed an amicus brief supporting the Texas lawsuit.

Representative Greg Pence, the brother of Vice President Mike Pence, who is a former Indiana governor and refused to overturn the election results, objected to Pennsylvania but not Arizona and signed the amicus brief.


Read the full methodology
Story by: Ryan Teague Beckwith and Bill Allison
Graphics by: Paul Murray, Allison McCartney and Mira Rojanasakul
With assistance by: Rachael Dottle, Marie Patino, Jenny Zhang, Gregory Korte, Romy Varghese, Vincent Del Giudice, Nathan Crooks, Margaret Newkirk, Shruti Date Singh, David Welch, Elise Young, Dina Bass, Brendan Walsh, Carey Goldberg and Maria Wood
Editors: Wendy Benjaminson, Wes Kosova, Alex Tribou and Yue Qiu
Photo editors: Eugene Reznik, Marisa Gertz and Maria Wood
Photo credits: Getty Images, Bloomberg and AP Photo