Alabama

Snapshot: Alabama receives a poor score on voting access, meeting two of our seven benchmarks, and a good score on ballot security, meeting six of our eight benchmarks. But there are some red flags among how the state’s elected officials have responded to Trump’s claims.

Ease of Voting

Some measures to expand access
3 out of 7 benchmarks

Ballot Security

Many measures to ensure accuracy and security
6 out of 8 benchmarks

What Politicians Say

Several responses that undermined the 2020 election
2 out of 4 benchmarks

Alabama banned curbside voting, an innovation that has helped people with disabilities cast their ballots in person.

During the coronavirus pandemic, some local elections administrators in Alabama began allowing voters to fill out their ballots while waiting in a car outside a polling place, but Secretary of State John Merrill ruled that state law prohibited it.

A group of disabled voters sued, arguing the ban violated the Americans With Disabilities Act, and the argument went all the way to the Supreme Court, which sided with Merrill.

In 2021, the state legislature amended state law to explicitly ban curbside voting.


Ease of Voting

Is the state making it easy for eligible voters to register and cast a ballot?
Met 0 out of 0 benchmarks
How Alabama compares to other states
Alabama
Other states
← Easier to vote
Harder →
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Number of total benchmarks met

Alabama made no changes to state law that would affect voting access.


Ballot Security

Is the state following best practices to ensure ballot counting is accurate and timely?
Met 0 out of 0 benchmarks
How Alabama compares to other states
Alabama
Other states
← More secure
Less secure →
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Number of total benchmarks met

A 2021 law authorized the secretary of state to conduct a one-time post-election audit of three counties after the midterms this fall.

Another 2021 law made a first offense for voting twice in the same election a misdemeanor, and a second offense a felony. Previously, all unlawful voting was a felony.

Lawmakers also passed a law in 2021 that allowed the state to join the Electronic Registration Information Center, a nonprofit that helps states see when a voter has moved or registered to vote in another state.

The legislature also banned elections administrators from accepting private donations to run elections, such as the grants local elections officials in Alabama asked for and received from Meta Platforms Inc Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg in 2020.

Read More: Zuckerberg’s Election Aid Spurs GOP Drive in 30 States to Ban It


How Politicians Responded to the 2020 Election

What did the state do in the aftermath of Trump's defeat?
Met 0 out of 0 benchmarks
How Alabama compares to other states
Alabama
Other states
← Fewer efforts to undermine 2020 election
More →
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Number of total benchmarks met

Republican Governor Kay Ivey congratulated Joe Biden after his inauguration, but facing a primary challenge in 2022 she ran a TV ad arguing that “fake news, big tech and blue-state liberals stole the election.”

Attorney General Steve Marshall supported a Texas lawsuit asking the Supreme Court to intervene in the election. Testifying before Congress in 2022, he refused to call Biden the “duly elected and lawfully serving” president.

US Senator Tommy Tuberville objected to the certification of Biden electors from Arizona and Pennsylvania.

All six of Alabama’s Republican US representatives objected to Arizona and Pennsylvania. Five signed an amicus brief in support of the Texas lawsuit.

Republican Secretary of State nominee Wes Allen has falsely claimed that a nonpartisan group that helps states compare voter rolls is bankrolled by financier George Soros and pledged to stop working with it.


Read the full methodology
Story by: Ryan Teague Beckwith and Bill Allison
Graphics by: Paul Murray, Allison McCartney and Mira Rojanasakul
With assistance by: Rachael Dottle, Marie Patino, Jenny Zhang, Gregory Korte, Romy Varghese, Vincent Del Giudice, Nathan Crooks, Margaret Newkirk, Shruti Date Singh, David Welch, Elise Young, Dina Bass, Brendan Walsh, Carey Goldberg and Maria Wood
Editors: Wendy Benjaminson, Wes Kosova, Alex Tribou and Yue Qiu
Photo editors: Eugene Reznik, Marisa Gertz and Maria Wood
Photo credits: Getty Images, Bloomberg and AP Photo