More Than 944 Million Shots Given: Covid-19 Tracker

In the U.S., 216 million doses have been administered
Updated:

The biggest vaccination campaign in history is underway. More than 944 million doses have been administered across 170 countries, according to data collected by Bloomberg. The latest rate was roughly 15.9 million doses a day.

In the U.S., 216 million doses have been given so far. In the last week, an average of 3.02 million doses per day were administered.

World Map of Vaccinations

More than 944 million doses have been administered—enough to vaccinate 6.2% of the global population
  • no data0151020%of population covered
Note: “Population covered” divides the doses administered for each vaccine type by the number of doses required for full vaccination. Data gathered from government websites, press conferences, public statements and Bloomberg interviews.

Enough doses have now been administered to fully vaccinate 6.2% of the global population—but the distribution has been lopsided. Countries with the highest incomes are getting vaccinated about 25 times faster than those with the lowest.

Uneven Access to Vaccines

Note: Vaccine access calculations account for the number of doses needed for full protection; some vaccines require a two-dose regimen while others require just a single dose. Countries are ordered by GDP per capita (PPP).

When will life return to normal?

While the best vaccines are thought to be 95% effective, it takes a coordinated campaign to stop a pandemic. Anthony Fauci, the top infectious-disease official in the U.S., has said that vaccinating 70% to 85% of the U.S. population would enable a return to normalcy.

On a global scale, that’s a daunting level of vaccination. At the current pace of 15.9 million a day, it would take years to achieve a significant level of global immunity. The rate, however, is steadily increasing, and new vaccines by additional manufacturers are coming to market.

The Path to Immunity Around the World

Note: Immunity calculations take into account the number of doses required and the current rate of administration for each vaccine type. The “daily rate estimate” is a seven-day trailing average; interpolation is used for countries with infrequent updates. Data are from Bloomberg’s Covid-19 Vaccine Tracker.

Are we bending the curve yet?

Israel was first to show that vaccinations were having a nationwide effect. The country has led the world in vaccinations, and by February more than 84% of people ages 70 and older had received two doses. Severe covid cases and deaths declined rapidly. A separate analysis in the U.K. showed similar results.

It’s now a life-and-death contest between vaccine and virus. New strains threaten renewed outbreaks. In the early stages of a campaign, the effect of vaccinations are often outweighed by other factors of transmissibility: virus mutations, seasonality, effectiveness of mask use and social distancing. In time, higher vaccination rates should limit the Covid-19 burden around the world.

Vaccinations vs. Cases

Covid rates have flattened or declined in the    places where enough vaccines have been given to cover at least    of the population.
Note: “People covered” divides the doses administered for each vaccine type by the number of doses required for full vaccination. Vaccine data from Bloomberg’s Covid-19 Tracker. Cases data: Johns Hopkins University.

Since the start of the global vaccination campaign, countries have experienced unequal access to vaccines and varying degrees of efficiency in getting shots into people’s arms. Before March, few African nations had received a single shipment of shots. In the U.S., 65.0 doses have been administered for every 100 people.

Delivering billions of vaccines to stop the spread of Covid-19 worldwide will be one of the greatest logistical challenges ever undertaken.

Race to End the Pandemic

Seychelles leads the world, with enough vaccinations to cover 60.9% of its population
Note: “People covered” divides the doses administered for each vaccine type by the number of doses required for full vaccination. Data from Bloomberg’s Covid-19 Vaccine Tracker

Global Vaccination Campaign

Note: Population coverage accounts for the number of doses required for each vaccine administered. The daily rate is a 7-day average; for countries that don’t report daily, the last-known average rate is used.

U.S. Vaccinations: State by State

The U.S. leads the world in total vaccines administered, and more supply is on the way. Drugmakers have promised to deliver enough shots to fully vaccinate more than 300 million people by the end of June. That’s more than enough for every adult, and clinical studies in children are underway.

Distribution in the U.S. is directed by the federal government. Pfizer and BioNTech’s vaccine, as well as Moderna’s shot both require two doses taken several weeks apart. J&J’s inoculation requires just a single dose.

Time to Deliver

Vaccine makers pledge 700M doses for the U.S. by the end of July—enough to cover 400M people
  • Vaccines available
  • Delivery targets
  • Projected
Source: “Unknown manufacturer” refers to vaccine allocations reported by the White House that are not further identified; the coverage calculation assumes they are two-dose vaccines. Specified allocations are from CDC. Targets are provided by the manufacturers and don’t always align with government forecasts for availability.

The introduction of J&J’s one-shot option in March is speeding up deliveries and making it easier to vaccinate hard-to-reach populations. So far, 134 million Americans have received at least one dose of a vaccine—52.1% of the adult population. At least 87.6 million people have completed a vaccination regimen.

Vaccines Across America

Across the U.S., enough doses have been administered to cover 33.7% of the population, and 78% of the delivered shots have been used

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Note: “Population covered” divides the doses administered for each vaccine type by the number of doses required for full vaccination. Data added after Feb. 20 is from the CDC and includes doses administered by federal entities in state totals. Prior data from the Bloomberg Covid-19 Tracker. It can take several days for counts to be reported through the CDC database.

The U.S. hasn’t yet achieved vaccination rates high enough to quell the outbreaks. New Covid variants have driven a surge in cases in some states—especially Michigan. Even states with relatively high vaccine coverage, including Minnesota and Pennsylvania, have seen their numbers rise.

Younger, unvaccinated populations are increasingly viewed as key to heading off a potential fourth wave. New vaccine supplies have allowed states to open up eligibility to wide swaths of residents. President Joe Biden has said that by April 19 all adults will be eligible to get vaccinated. Until recently, eligibility has mostly been based on age, occupation, and underlying medical conditions.

U.S. Vaccinations vs. Cases

Covid rates have generally flattened or declined in the    states where enough vaccines have been given to cover at least    of the population.
Note: “People covered” divides the doses administered for each vaccine type by the number of doses required for full vaccination. Vaccine data from Bloomberg’s Covid-19 Tracker. Cases data: Johns Hopkins University.

It takes about two weeks after a final vaccine dose for immunity to fully develop. After that, a person can safely meet indoors with other vaccinated people without wearing masks, according to CDC guidance issued in March. Grandparents can spend time with their grandchildren again.

Even for people fully vaccinated, some restrictions remain in place while the virus still circulates across the country. The CDC advises against travel and recommends wearing masks and social distancing while in public.

How State Vaccinations Stack Up

New Hampshire leads all states, with enough vaccinations to cover 42.8% of its populations
Note: Two doses are needed for full protection with the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, while the J&J shot requires a single dose. Data from Bloomberg’s Covid-19 Vaccine Tracker

After focusing first on hospitals and other institutional health-care settings, states have expanded the number of places that offer the shots. Mass vaccination centers were created from sport stadiums, theme parks, convention halls and race tracks. Millions of doses are now being shipped directly to local pharmacies.

The vaccines available today are only approved for people over the age of 16. Pfizer and BioNTech have asked the FDA to expand authorization to ages 12 and older. Tests for dosing, safety, and effectiveness are underway in younger ages, with results expected later this year.

The Path to Immunity in the U.S.

Note: Vaccinating roughly 70% to 85% of a country’s population would enable a return to normalcy, according to top U.S. infectious disease doctor Anthony Fauci. Immunity calculations take into account the number of doses required and the current rate of administration for each vaccine type. Data are from Bloomberg’s Covid-19 Vaccine Tracker.

U.S. Vaccination Campaign

Note: The category entry for Federal Entities isn’t counted in the country total because those vaccinations are already included in relevant state totals. The “Unassigned” entry refers to vaccinations from CDC’s U.S. totals that the agency didn’t assign to a specific state or territory. “Doses administered” figures include all vaccinations within a state, regardless of a person’s residency, while population coverage data only accounts for residency. “Shots used” shows the proportion of administered vaccines compared with the total doses received by a state.

Vaccine Timeline

Bloomberg is tracking the development of nine of the globe’s most promising vaccines. A total of seven vaccines are now available for public use, in limited quantities, in at least 170 countries.

Nations have poured billions of dollars into developing new vaccine technologies, testing them in thousands of volunteers, scaling up manufacturing, and then bringing them to market in record time.

None of these shots, on its own, is enough to inoculate a global population of some 7.8 billion people. But together they represent humanity’s best chance of ending a scourge that has claimed more than 2.6 million lives and triggered global economic calamity.

When to Expect the Next Vaccine

Progress:
  • Trial
  • Awaiting approval
  • Available to public
  • Trial size
  • Doses required
  • Storage temperature
  • Efficacy
Note: Data are based on interviews, company disclosures, news reports and government data. In many countries, vaccines are first coming to market under emergency measures that let them bypass normal regulatory requirements. Because millions of people will get the vaccines under these rules, they are displayed as “available to the public.” Bloomberg will note when the regulatory status changes in the future.

Correction (April 18): Stopped tracking Quebec second doses due to a methodological problem, which will lower the total number of fully vaccinated Canadians.

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