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Fly Charts: Apple's Grading Curve and Walmart's Online Push

From a new pharmacy player to Qualcomm's turnaround, here are four charts that tell you what you need to know in business today.
Photographer: Justin Sullivan

Good morning! This is Fly Charts, the daily charts-only newsletter from Gadfly; sign up here. From a new pharmacy player to Qualcomm's turnaround, here are four charts that tell you what you need to know in business today.

Debutantes

Apple's tendency to grade itself on a constantly evolving curve of its own design makes it exceedingly difficult to judge the company's performance.

Source: IDC (for Apple Watch) and Bloomberg (for iPhone)

Note: The analysis counted four full quarters and one partial quarter in the first year of iPhone sales.

Back to the Future

Buying Rite Aid throws Albertsons into the thick of a competitive pharmacy market. But it is still dwarfed by the biggest players.

Source: Company filings/presentations

As of most recent SEC filing. Rite Aid/Albertsons numbers are estimates from the deal presentation. Walgreens store count is a Gadfly estimate that includes stores acquired from Rite Aid.

Cooling Off

There's no reason to panic about Walmart's slowing internet sales yet. But it's not a thrilling sign as Walmart becomes more and more dependent on e-commerce.

Source: Bloomberg

It's Just Money

Against all odds and in spite of Elliott Management Corp.'s previous demands, Qualcomm's raised offer for NXP has given it new momentum in its fight with Broadcom.

Source: Bloomberg

And don't miss Liam Denning on the oil industry's gender issues: "It is difficult to thrive over the long term if you invest time and money in something -- a factory, a brand, a person -- and then, after several years, just let it slip away. Yet this is exactly one of the ways in which the oil and gas industry as a whole fails many of its female employees and ultimately itself. The survey found that women's satisfaction with their career progression fell to its lowest point when they had been in the job for three to five years, whereas their male counterparts' enthusiasm spiked just then."

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.

    To contact the author of this story:
    Max Nisen in New York at mnisen@bloomberg.net

    To contact the editor responsible for this story:
    Mark Gongloff at mgongloff1@bloomberg.net

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