Who Is Winning Silicon Valley's Talent Wars?

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July 31 (Bloomberg) -- Juliet De Baubigny, partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers and Bloomberg Industries' Anurag Rana examine the Silicon Valley talent wars and the lengths companies will go to on compensation to preserve creativity and prevent brain drain. She speaks on Bloomberg Television's "Bloomberg Surveilance."

As usual, it is open season, which is what makes it so fun.

What is interesting is the premiums companies will go to to retain talent.

Google is particularly aggressive, especially on the product side.

As our companies like apple, and certainly facebook.

What is really interesting is we have recently seen that young companies are able to actually, that large companies in hiring great talent.

They are able to obviously get a significant portion of options , but what is really fascinating is you are seeing a generational shift where instead of individuals being in their 40's and '50's wanting to stay with companies leaving for economic security, you are seeing those in the 20's start to move.

What about a company like apple?

For now stumbling through some missteps.

Are people leaving apple in droves?

They are not.

What is fascinating to me is the team and how they have stayed together.

Bob mansfield and his departure last week.

Just one.

That was planned for two years.

And so no surprises there.

What is really interesting to me is the level of zero entrepreneurs that apple has spawned.

You look at people who left to start companies.

You are seeing the founder of a great, innovative company.

Apple has spawned an incredible group of entrepreneurs.

You cover these companies for more of a security perspective and analysis.

With innovation and ideas such a hot commodity, what do wall street analysts and investors think about the brain drain as some of these companies?

To go what is most interesting when you have money flowing into smaller companies.

They have to get folks that have done it once or really understand where the next big thing will be.

Are you concerned that is not happening at apple?

I do not cover apple that closely.

If you were to look at smaller or mid-sized companies, you would get executives from those companies, bring them on, and hopefully get the same kind of valuations and growth.

I want to frame how much.

Frame how much these people make that are not stars.

A kid out of a major school in computer science, one, to jobs.

You go after him for a team x, what is the pay package?

Depends on the company.

It is just like the all-star game.

You know the numbers.

Could be anywhere from $3 million of the value of equity and add a few members -- zero on to that.

Huge numbers for basic operators.

Would you say it is worth it for these companies to pay up so they do not go elsewhere?

To go without a doubt.

-- without a doubt.

It is the magnet of the talent affect for the fact that people will follow talent.

In silicon valley, these are young, growth companies and the definition of a culture in the early engineers who found it.

Looking at companies like facebook for example that has a strong, identifiable culture.

These of the reason why companies are successful in the long-term.

Is there room for wall street talon to move?

To go there is room for everyone

This text has been automatically generated. It may not be 100% accurate.

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