What's Microsoft's Role in NSA's Prism?

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July 12 (Bloomberg) -- Bloomberg's Jordan Robertson discusses Microsoft's role in government surveillance with Cory Johnson on Bloomberg Television's "Bloomberg West." (Source: Bloomberg)

Reported -- bloomberg reporter jordan robertson.

Skype built itself as, this is encrypted communication.

We cannot even wiretapping itself.

-- wire tap itself.

These documents reveal the degree to which microsoft and over backwards to help the governments bypass that encryption and listen to phone calls and get the video for those phone calls as well.

We still don't have a sense of the scale of how many these were.

The company is insisting their individual case, they were only doing it as their name attached to it.

The newspaper suggests it is more without saying so.

We still don't have numbers.

The companies that have come out and given some numbers, tens of thousands of requests for user data.

If one request says, give us everything -- and in different programs, we saw this one amazing document that said to a business, give us everything.

What is remarkable is the degree to which microsoft had said if the government wants this data, we're going going to modify our products to allow them easier access.

Skype is the best example.

Talk to me about when this encryption happened, how it works, and white is so important to to see these messages before they are encrypted.

As a security reporter i advise people a lot.

If you want to protect your communications use encryption.

What we are referring to is if you want to protect your communications from hackers.

If you're in internet cafe you want to have in on your e-mail so the guy you're sitting next to cannot get access to it.

The company whose services you are using always has access to your information.

If the government asks him for it, they can supply it.

Encryption does not necessarily prevent the company from seeing it.

You'd have to add another layer of encryption on top of it.

Is it possible these programs always worked like this, that when the company said don't worry, it is encrypted before we can look at it, maybe it wasn't an there was always a methodology that allowed us to do this?

There may very well have been.

Microsoft is intimated in its statements that as it acquires products and modifies, it may make it easier for the government to access information.

They have all but said that when they acquire skype, they somehow modified it.

The guardian story says that skype intercepts have tripled since the microsoft acquisition.

Skype was traditionally a favorite of technology for hackers and journalists.

It was billed as a very secure technology.

It may have been difficult for outside hackers to get access to it but it is not unreasonable to assume that the companies that own this data have had access to it for a long time.

The guys on the business side are freaking out what is going to cost the business.

This text has been automatically generated. It may not be 100% accurate.

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