UBS Chairman Weber: Yellen Is a Sign of Continuity

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Oct. 10 (Bloomberg) -- Axel Weber, chairman at UBS, explains why Janet Yellen will bring continuity to Federal Reserve policy. He speaks on Bloomberg Television’s “Bloomberg Surveillance.”

International markets and international economies of the continuity of said chief ben bernanke's policy?

My reading of it is the following -- i think we have in central banking now a very strong sense that central banks step in to prevent worse things happening.

They are trying to go back to more normal policies as to what is normalizing.

I think the big feature of this year has been a normalization of the world economy, the u.s. has taken again a lead position in the recovery.

Emerging markets have am now quite a bit.

They are lagging at the mormon.

Europe -- at the moment.

Europe is trying to come out of a deep crisis.

The central banks played a key role inaccurate i see it as a sign of continuity.

Janet yellen was a trademarked name in economics.

Very experienced during the crisis good i see it as a sign of continuity.

As chairman of ubs and formally with the budnndesbank, does janet yellen have the ability when the time is appropriate to act more bundesn bank-like?

I think that is a long stretch.

I think the view is more that's -- what will be more important in central bank he will be the committee views.

I think the fed is moving toward that.

The ecb is moving to that.

What matters is much less the person, the one person at the helm of the bank but more worthy committee sees the economy.

The fed has moved toward a communication that put the committee at the core.

Look at their projections are interest rate will be in the years going forward.

The consensus view were most of the people seeing interest rates

This text has been automatically generated. It may not be 100% accurate.

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