Is Twitter Priced Low to Pop on Opening Day?

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Oct. 24 (Bloomberg) -- Twitter is seeking as much as $1.4 billion in the largest Internet initial public offering since Facebook, betting it can convince investors of its ability to turn 500 million tweets a day into profits. Cory Johnson reports on Bloomberg Television's "Street Smart." (Source: Bloomberg)

We're going to call this an initial range of $17 to $20 a share.

Goldman sachs would not do this unless they had some indication of interest from clients from looking at what the deal is.

What's the business is going back.

So the share is their expected range.

That share good change -- could change.

Maybe not next week.

But twitter putting out an initial range $17 to $20. but is a little bit lighter than what we had heard.

One of the things banks like to do is put a low number on these things and then jacket up to suggest there is more interest.

-- jack it up to suggest there is more interest.

Facebook did not do that.

Is twitter trying to learn from their mistakes?

Certainly we know they are doing that.

We know the new york stock exchange has been preparing some simulations of the trading to get the thing ready and make a public statement of their ability to trade the stock long before it happens so that someone can say, this is not facebook.

This is not facebook.

This is a smudge smaller offering -- this is a much smaller offering.

In terms of the pricing game, we will see what the interest is.

We will see where the markets are.

Despite some sort of weak results from technology companies in terms of stocks, we will see if the market is strong for this deal in the next few weeks.

Twitter coming to market with an ipo.

Microsoft coming to market with earnings.

Julie hyman.

This text has been automatically generated. It may not be 100% accurate.

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