Twitter’s Challenge to Retain Best and Brightest

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Nov. 6 (Bloomberg) -- Bloomberg senior West Coast correspondent Jon Erlichman examines Twitter’s challenge to retain talent and how going public affects the culture of the company. He speaks on Bloomberg Television’s “Market Makers.”

Twitter's headquarters in san francisco.

Talk to us about the employee size.

Are people walking out high- fiving saying i am rich, i am leaving.

Throw their money around.

None of that yet, maybe tomorrow morning.

One of the things twitter highlights in its ipo documents, one of the risk factors is tied to the employees.

You cannot attract the best talent all the time and you cannot retain the talent.

That plays into the ipo itself.

We have seen this workforce exploded in -- over the last couple of years, 3200 employees.

Compare that to google, 46,000, it looks pretty small.

From this time last year, 87% more people working at twitter.

Are those people doing exactly what they need to do to get this company where he needs to be.

To your point, in six months, if a lockup expires and you have stock and you leave, what can twitter do to keep you at the company and keep you motivated.

Facebook lost some people.

It's workforce has risen over the last year.

The ipo makes people feel great, they are having a huge party.

How does it affect the culture of the company, is it going to change, besides the parking lot being filled with teslas.

We have been asking a lot of people that.

It starts with dick costolo, a relatively low-key person.

The management are not selling stock as part of this ipo, this sends a message they are in it for the long-term.

You will hear about the fact that this is not a profitable company.

That is a choice by twitter, we're building something for the long-term, we have to decide how we use our money.

We went from $20 million in revenue $2.5 billion now.

Let's try to build something.

That is the kind of culture they size.

Are people walking out high- fiving saying i am rich, i am leaving.

Throw their money around.

None of that yet, maybe tomorrow morning.

One of the things twitter highlights in its ipo documents, one of the risk factors is tied to the employees.

You cannot attract the best talent all the time and you cannot retain the talent.

That plays into the ipo itself.

We have seen this workforce exploded in -- over the last couple of years, 3200 employees.

Compare that to google, 46,000, it looks pretty small.

From this time last year, 87% more people working at twitter.

Are those people doing exactly what they need to do to get this company where he needs to be.

To your point, in six months, if a lockup expires and you have stock and you leave, what can twitter do to keep you at the company and keep you motivated.

Facebook lost some people.

It's workforce has risen over the last year.

The ipo makes people feel great, they are having a huge party.

How does it affect the culture of the company, is it going to change, besides the parking lot being filled with teslas.

We have been asking a lot of people that.

It starts with dick costolo, a relatively low-key person.

The management are not selling stock as part of this ipo, this sends a message they are in it for the long-term.

You will hear about the fact that this is not a profitable company.

That is a choice by twitter, we're building something for the long-term, we have to decide how we use our money.

We went from $20 million in revenue $2.5 billion now.

Let's try to build something.

That is the kind of culture they

This text has been automatically generated. It may not be 100% accurate.

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