What's the Best (and Worst) Ad Campaign on Twitter?

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Nov. 11 (Bloomberg) -- Bloomberg deals reporter Cristina Alesci looks at the most effective Twitter ad campaigns and some that backfired as well. She speaks on Bloomberg Television’s “In The Loop.”

Cristina alesci joins us.

Is social advertising paying off for those companies?

The major criticism is that it is ephemeral and it does not engage users the way it should.

Users have banner blindness, they ignore the advertising.

One brand i have found that actually engaged users effectively was luvs diapers.

They had a compelling campaign and brooklyn, where there are a lot of terrance with children but not as many cars.

Parents sometimes need cars to put their children to bed, motion puts the baby to bed.

Luvs encouraged parents in brooklyn to tweet at them when they needed a ride, luvs sent a vehicle to pick them up.

We don't know how many diapers this actually resulted in selling in terms of an increase in sales, but there was an increase in engagement.

The number of times luvs was mentioned on twitter, and there was an increase in followers.

To the extent you can measure anything, it is one measure.

It is.

These strategies are clearly successful.

What about some of the flops?

Home depot had a huge flop last week.

They are not alone.

One of the things people don't realize, when you advertise on twitter, you need to set up a mini newsroom of people that can react to real-time events and really position the brand and capitalize on live events.

The problem is, that could backfire.

Indicates of home depot, also, gap during hurricane sandy encouraged people to say "safe and sound and shopping on cap.com." a lot of people found that inappropriate.

This could be a thing that backfires as well.

Thank you, cristina alesci on

This text has been automatically generated. It may not be 100% accurate.

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